Nerve Entrapment in the Lower Extremity

This article will cover the minutiae of the sites of nerve compression in the hip and is probably of more interest to physical therapists or those who enjoy anatomy. For those that find medical jargon mind boggling, there is one point I want to get across. The cause of nerve entrapment and “sciatica” is difficult to diagnose, and is probably commonly misdiagnosed.

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Christopher EllisComment
Anterior Tilt of the Scapula

The scapula has a very important role in shoulder function. There are several planes of motion that the scapula can move within. One plane in particular can become problematic; anterior tipping.

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Does Your Hip Click? Maybe It’s FAI (Femoroacetabular Impingement)

The body makes sounds. Sometimes it’s just gas bubbles popping inside of a joint, sometimes it’s tendons rolling over each other, sometimes it’s bony anatomy. As a general rule of thumb, if it doesn’t hurt, it’s probably nothing to be concerned with. However, painful clicking or popping may be a sign of something lurking that should be addressed.

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Sleep and Vitality: Here's What You Need to Know

Humans are the only animal on the planet that intentionally deprive themselves of sleep. Increasingly, our demands of work and the stigma of laziness for those who sleep in, have led to an overall decrease in total sleep across the population in industrialized countries. Our bodies are not equipped to deal with a lack of sleep and a cascade of negative events occur without rest. Lack of sleep can disrupt both mind and body and the consequences can be devastating.

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Anterior Ankle Impingement

Anterior ankle impingement is an umbrella term that refers to pain in the front of the ankle when dorsiflexing the foot, particularly in load bearing.

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Posterior Ankle Impingement

Posterior ankle impingement syndrome (PAIS) is a term that describes pain in the back of the ankle when plantar flexing maximally, and sometimes when dorsiflexing. There are several reasons this can happen and can be a result of a bony process, unfused ossicles (small bones), or soft tissue (muscle/tendon/ligament/capsule).

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Muscle Strains Part 3: The Hamstrings

Hamstring strains are very frustrating for athletes and they are one of the most common muscle strains in sports. Recurrence rates of hamstring strains are estimated at 12-33%

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Muscle Strains Part 2: The Adductors (Groin) and Hockey

Groin injuries are very common in vigorous sports such as wrestling, soccer, football, and especially hockey. In fact, about half of all muscle strains for hockey players are groin related. The mechanism for injury is not fully understood but we do know that it is not from contact, rather it happens in the powerful stride.

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The Real Culprit in Knee Pain

The knee is a very sturdy joint. It’s a hinge joint and basically has two main functions; it bends and straightens. Most problems in the knee stem from it’s less stable neighbors, the foot and the hip.

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Tennis Elbow

Most elbow issues such as tennis elbow and Golfer’s elbow are overuse injuries. Ironically, golfers tend to get tennis elbow and tennis players tend to get Golfer’s elbow. There are a number of variables that will predispose you to this type of injury. Suddenly increasing your activity level or changing your grip can set you up for injury. Or, if you are missing range of motion in your shoulder or wrist, your body will find what it needs in the elbow which becomes another form of overuse.

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SI Dysfunction

Don’t rush out to get an MRI, it is probably your SI joint. SI refers to the sacro-iliac joint. This is where your sacrum meets the iliac crest of your pelvis. This joint has a small degree of motion and the pelvis rotates slightly back and forth on the sacrum as you walk. It is common for it to rotate too much and be either anteriorly or posteriorly rotated (tilted) which is known as an SI dysfunction.

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Cartilage

The inevitable wearing away of cartilage on the ends of our bones presents a significant problem to the aging/athletic population, and to the medical world.

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Christopher EllisComment
Beat The Kumora

For those Brazilian Jiu-jitsu enthusiasts out there, want to know how to beat the Kumora with some simple stretching?

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Christopher EllisComment
Lateral Hip Pain With Golf

Have you ever felt a sharp pain in your lead hip during your golf swing? The likely culprit: hip bursitis. There is probably a compensation in your swing due to a lack of range of motion in your hips or spine, or both.

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Christopher EllisComment
What Is Motion Sickness?

You are on a cruise ship in your room and your stomach starts to rumble. Or maybe you are in a car reading a book in the back seat and get nauseated. Why does this happen? We are not 100% sure but it may be due to what is called the “sensory conflict theory” or “neural mismatch”.

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Christopher EllisComment
The Infamous IT Band

Irritation of the IT band takes much longer to reduce compared to a muscle due to the lack of blood supply. Finding the underlying mechanism is the key to long term recovery.

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Christopher EllisComment
How to Deadlift Correctly

I remember before I was a physio, I was terrified of the deadlift. I kept hearing that I would ‘throw my back out’, don’t bother with it, just use the leg press and that is just as good as the deadlift. Wrong.

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Christopher EllisComment